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Culture

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The content on Tumblr creates an incredibly immersive platform that brands can tap into. 70% of users visit Tumblr more than once a day and thirty four percent “would rather be on the site than sleep.” They are more likely to put their faith in brands that provide engaging content. and are more likely to share these brands with their friends.

2014 was a big year for social media and activism: from pro-democracy demonstrations in Hong Kong, to raising $100 million for ALS research, to providing a stomping ground for nascent conversations about race and police brutality, the range of social media’s involvement in good causes has grown. But. For every stirring story of activism organized on Twitter, there is an equally un-stirring story about hashtags that don’t do anything. Except to make us feel like we’re doing something. “Hashtag Activism” – it’s a phrase reserved for ineffective, vaguely narcissistic Twitter do-gooding.

This past Sunday, 400,000 people took part in the People’s Climate March in New York City to demand action on climate change. The march made the front page of The New York Times, but received the usual mix of coverage and inattention that climate activists have come to expect from traditional news media. The same day, there was a second climate march- one that made its own coverage. It was a digital march that engaged participants across the globe on the new battleground for change: social media.