EMPLOYERS IMPROVE 2019 PAY OFFER! The Police Staff Council met on 22 August to continue negotiations on the 2019 pay award. The Employers Side made an improved offer to the Trade Unions as follows: • 2.5% increase on all pay points with effect from 1 September 2019 • 2.5% increase on Standby Allowance with effect from 1 September 2019 (increase from £30.05 to £30.80) • A Police Staff Council Joint Circular to promote the TUC Dying to Work Charter The Trade Unions expressed disappointment that the Employers were not able to respond positively to those parts of their claim seeking the deletion of the lowest two pay points on the Police Staff Council pay scale and also an increase in minimum annual leave entitlement. As a result the unions asked the employers to consider increasing the lowest pay point in the Police Staff Council pay scale to match the Real Living Wage, namely to increase the value of this pay point from £ 17,262 to £17,364 before applying the eventual pay rise for this year. The Employers agreed to take this proposal away for consideration. We will now be calling a meeting of the Police Staff Sector Committee in the very near future to consider the Employers revised offer. Consultation with Police Staff members over the offer is expected to follow these meetings. Lyndsay Smith Branch Secretary
EMPLOYERS IMPROVE 2019 PAY OFFER! The Police Staff Council met on 22 August to continue negotiations on the 2019 pay award. The Employers Side made an improved offer to the Trade Unions as follows: • 2.5% increase on all pay points with effect from 1 September 2019 • 2.5% increase on Standby Allowance with effect from 1 September 2019 (increase from £30.05 to £30.80) • A Police Staff Council Joint Circular to promote the TUC Dying to Work Charter The Trade Unions expressed disappointment that the Employers were not able to respond positively to those parts of their claim seeking the deletion of the lowest two pay points on the Police Staff Council pay scale and also an increase in minimum annual leave entitlement. As a result the unions asked the employers to consider increasing the lowest pay point in the Police Staff Council pay scale to match the Real Living Wage, namely to increase the value of this pay point from £ 17,262 to £17,364 before applying the eventual pay rise for this year. The Employers agreed to take this proposal away for consideration. We will now be calling a meeting of the Police Staff Sector Committee in the very near future to consider the Employers revised offer. Consultation with Police Staff members over the offer is expected to follow these meetings. Lyndsay Smith Branch Secretary
Government only doing ‘half the job’ by replacing police officers, says UNISON The government must replace 22,000 police community support officer (PCSO) and other police staff jobs axed since the start of austerity, UNISON said today (Wednesday). The union warns that Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s pledge to recruit extra police officers is not enough on its own to halt the rise in serious and violent crime. Ministers and police chiefs must also restore the entire police workforce to 2010 levels by replacing the thousands of police staff jobs lost since 2010, says UNISON. This includes taking on more 999 call takers, fingerprint experts and detention officers. It comes as government figures* show PCSO numbers have nearly halved, from 16,918 in March 2010 to 9,547 in March 2019. Police staff jobs too have reduced by more than 17% over the same period, from 83,843 to 69,305. UNISON is concerned that the extra police officers promised by the government will not end up on the beat. Instead, they will be carrying out jobs currently done by police staff, unless the entire police ‘team’ is rebuilt. UNISON national officer for police staff Ben Priestley said: “Recruiting new police officers is a start. It’s necessary if the government is serious about tackling the rise in serious and violent crime that’s happened on its watch. “But this isn’t enough on its own – it’s only doing half the job. These officers won't have the team needed to cut crime without more police staff such as crime scene investigators, specialists in cybercrime and data analysts. “Just as doctors alone can’t run a hospital, officers can’t patrol the beat and tackle crime without police staff and PCSOs working alongside them. “Ministers must restore the entire police workforce to 2010 levels, not just part of it. Otherwise the community will suffer the consequences.” UNISON has written to the police minister Kit Malthouse as well as organisations, including the National Police Chiefs’ Council and the Association of Police and Crime Commissioners, urging them to support its campaign to rebuild the whole police team. Notes to editors: - UNISON is the UK’s largest union, with more than 1.3 million members providing public services – in education, local government, the NHS, police service and energy. They are employed in both the public and private sectors. - *A total of 14,538 police staff jobs and 7,371 PCSO jobs have been cut since 2010, according to Home Office police workforce data. - Police staff undertake vital work for police forces and include crime scene examiners, fingerprint experts, investigators and detention officers. - Office for National Statistics figures show that certain crimes including stalking and harassment, and possession of weapons have risen significantly between April 2018 and March 2019.
Government only doing ‘half the job’ by replacing police officers, says UNISON The government must replace 22,000 police community support officer (PCSO) and other police staff jobs axed since the start of austerity, UNISON said today (Wednesday). The union warns that Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s pledge to recruit extra police officers is not enough on its own to halt the rise in serious and violent crime. Ministers and police chiefs must also restore the entire police workforce to 2010 levels by replacing the thousands of police staff jobs lost since 2010, says UNISON. This includes taking on more 999 call takers, fingerprint experts and detention officers. It comes as government figures* show PCSO numbers have nearly halved, from 16,918 in March 2010 to 9,547 in March 2019. Police staff jobs too have reduced by more than 17% over the same period, from 83,843 to 69,305. UNISON is concerned that the extra police officers promised by the government will not end up on the beat. Instead, they will be carrying out jobs currently done by police staff, unless the entire police ‘team’ is rebuilt. UNISON national officer for police staff Ben Priestley said: “Recruiting new police officers is a start. It’s necessary if the government is serious about tackling the rise in serious and violent crime that’s happened on its watch. “But this isn’t enough on its own – it’s only doing half the job. These officers won't have the team needed to cut crime without more police staff such as crime scene investigators, specialists in cybercrime and data analysts. “Just as doctors alone can’t run a hospital, officers can’t patrol the beat and tackle crime without police staff and PCSOs working alongside them. “Ministers must restore the entire police workforce to 2010 levels, not just part of it. Otherwise the community will suffer the consequences.” UNISON has written to the police minister Kit Malthouse as well as organisations, including the National Police Chiefs’ Council and the Association of Police and Crime Commissioners, urging them to support its campaign to rebuild the whole police team. Notes to editors: - UNISON is the UK’s largest union, with more than 1.3 million members providing public services – in education, local government, the NHS, police service and energy. They are employed in both the public and private sectors. - *A total of 14,538 police staff jobs and 7,371 PCSO jobs have been cut since 2010, according to Home Office police workforce data. - Police staff undertake vital work for police forces and include crime scene examiners, fingerprint experts, investigators and detention officers. - Office for National Statistics figures show that certain crimes including stalking and harassment, and possession of weapons have risen significantly between April 2018 and March 2019.
𝐔𝐍𝐈𝐎𝐍𝐒 𝐀𝐒𝐊 𝐅𝐎𝐑 𝐏𝐀𝐘 𝐓𝐀𝐋𝐊𝐒 𝐓𝐎 𝐑𝐄𝐒𝐔𝐌𝐄 𝐅𝐎𝐋𝐋𝐎𝐖𝐈𝐍𝐆 𝐎𝐅𝐅𝐈𝐂𝐄𝐑 𝐀𝐖𝐀𝐑𝐃 The Police Staff Council Trade Unions (UNISON, UNITE and GMB) are pressing for our pay talks to restart following the news about this year’s police officer pay award. You will remember that the trade unions rejected the first pay offer - for a 2% pay increase - which we received from the Employers back in June. The unions rejected this offer because it came nowhere near our claim, and would have done very little to improve the financial situation of most members. 𝐏𝐎𝐋𝐈𝐂𝐄 𝐎𝐅𝐅𝐈𝐂𝐄𝐑 𝐏𝐀𝐘 𝐀𝐖𝐀𝐑𝐃 𝟐𝟎𝟏𝟗 The police officer pay award for 2019/20 was announced in Parliament on 22 July. It will be implemented with effect from 1 September 2019 as follows: • 2.5% increase to basic pay • 2.5% increase to London Weighting • 2.5% increase to the Dog Handlers’ Allowance • An increase in the On-Call Allowance from £15 to £20. 𝐏𝐎𝐋𝐈𝐂𝐄 𝐒𝐓𝐀𝐅𝐅 𝐏𝐀𝐘 𝐂𝐋𝐀𝐈𝐌 Here is a reminder of the pay claim which the unions submitted on behalf of police staff members back in April this year: • 5% increase on all pay point • 5% increase on standby allowance • The deletion of pay points 7 & 8 • An additional two days on the minimum annual leave entitlement in the Police Staff Council Handbook, to provide 25 days annual leave on appointment and 30 days leave after 5 years service • Support and encouragement from the Police Staff Council for police forces to sign up to the ‘Dying to Work’ Charter which provides for a compassionate approach to staff who have been diagnosed with a terminal illness 𝐍𝐄𝐗𝐓 𝐒𝐓𝐄𝐏𝐒 The unions hope that we can meet with the Employers next month to conclude our pay negotiations with an improved offer. More information will be available as soon as possible.
𝐔𝐍𝐈𝐎𝐍𝐒 𝐀𝐒𝐊 𝐅𝐎𝐑 𝐏𝐀𝐘 𝐓𝐀𝐋𝐊𝐒 𝐓𝐎 𝐑𝐄𝐒𝐔𝐌𝐄 𝐅𝐎𝐋𝐋𝐎𝐖𝐈𝐍𝐆 𝐎𝐅𝐅𝐈𝐂𝐄𝐑 𝐀𝐖𝐀𝐑𝐃 The Police Staff Council Trade Unions (UNISON, UNITE and GMB) are pressing for our pay talks to restart following the news about this year’s police officer pay award. You will remember that the trade unions rejected the first pay offer - for a 2% pay increase - which we received from the Employers back in June. The unions rejected this offer because it came nowhere near our claim, and would have done very little to improve the financial situation of most members. 𝐏𝐎𝐋𝐈𝐂𝐄 𝐎𝐅𝐅𝐈𝐂𝐄𝐑 𝐏𝐀𝐘 𝐀𝐖𝐀𝐑𝐃 𝟐𝟎𝟏𝟗 The police officer pay award for 2019/20 was announced in Parliament on 22 July. It will be implemented with effect from 1 September 2019 as follows: • 2.5% increase to basic pay • 2.5% increase to London Weighting • 2.5% increase to the Dog Handlers’ Allowance • An increase in the On-Call Allowance from £15 to £20. 𝐏𝐎𝐋𝐈𝐂𝐄 𝐒𝐓𝐀𝐅𝐅 𝐏𝐀𝐘 𝐂𝐋𝐀𝐈𝐌 Here is a reminder of the pay claim which the unions submitted on behalf of police staff members back in April this year: • 5% increase on all pay point • 5% increase on standby allowance • The deletion of pay points 7 & 8 • An additional two days on the minimum annual leave entitlement in the Police Staff Council Handbook, to provide 25 days annual leave on appointment and 30 days leave after 5 years service • Support and encouragement from the Police Staff Council for police forces to sign up to the ‘Dying to Work’ Charter which provides for a compassionate approach to staff who have been diagnosed with a terminal illness 𝐍𝐄𝐗𝐓 𝐒𝐓𝐄𝐏𝐒 The unions hope that we can meet with the Employers next month to conclude our pay negotiations with an improved offer. More information will be available as soon as possible.